Building Permits

Permit Applications

If you plan to build, renovate or demolish please apply for a building or septic permit through Cloudpermit, online:

  1. Register https://ca.cloudpermit.com/login 
  2. Login https://ca.cloudpermit.com/login with your email address
  3. Watch the instructional video - how to submit a building permit

All applications should include at a minimum, a detailed drawing of the proposed building/structure and a site plan showing the location of the proposed and existing buildings/structures on the property. Please include the building size, property size and proposed structure setback from lot lines. For details regarding your site plan, please refer to the Interactive Map - County of Simcoe (GIS)

Municipal staff review your application to ensure that it is complete and that it complies with the Building Code, the local zoning by-law and all other applicable laws. It may then be sent to other municipal officials for their consideration. Applications that involve simple alterations or additions can usually be dealt with fairly quickly, while more complex proposals naturally take longer to process. If a zoning change or minor variance or site plan approval is necessary, or if building plans must be altered to comply with the Ontario Building Code, the changes must be approved and in place before a building permit can be issued. Where there are problems with your proposal, local building officials will usually discuss them with you in detail before considering refusal of a permit. The following represents a summarized version of the building permit process:

1. BEFORE APPLYING

Before submitting an application, consult with municipal Building Officials and Planning Department.

2. THE APPLICATION 

Submit Application with supporting documentation on CloudPermit

3. CONSIDERATION

Application is reviewed for completeness and against local zoning by-laws, the Ontario Building Code and other legislation. 

4. DECISION

Application may be approved or refused.

In Ontario, a building permit is your formal permission to begin construction or demolition. It means that plans for any new structure, addition or renovation have been reviewed by the municipality, and that they generally conformity with the Ontario Building Code, the local zoning by-law and any other applicable laws and regulations.

Building permits regulate construction in a community and help to ensure applicable building standards and regulations are met. The building permit process protects the individual’s interests as well as those of the community at large, and provides for the safe erection, removal or alteration of buildings and other structures, in accordance with the Ontario Building Code.

By obtaining a permit, you can also take advantage of the professional expertise of Building Department staff. Inspectors are good sources of information and can offer suggestions to help solve construction problems, often before they occur.

When considering any kind of construction on your property, it is a good idea to discuss your plans with municipal staff first. They can advise you about any other permits or approvals you might need, such as demolition permits, zoning or minor variances and electrical permits.

It is unlawful to start construction without the necessary permits. If you start construction without the necessary permits, you may be ordered to stop work, ordered to remove work already done, or prosecuted.

Contact the Building Department if you are not sure whether you need a permit for your project.

If you are refused a building permit, the municipal Building Official will advise you of the reasons. If you have discussed the matter with them beforehand and have not been able to resolve the problems, you can follow one of several options:1. If the problem has to do with the interpretation of the technical requirements of the Building Code, you may appeal the application to the Building Code Commission (care of the Ministry of Housing, Buildings Branch). Reasons for the appeal must be given.2. If problems involve materials and construction techniques, you may appeal to the Building Materials Evaluation Commission by writing to the Secretary of the Commission.  Reasons for the appeal must be given.3. If the problem arises out of the interpretation of the zoning by-law, you may apply to a District Judge, who will review the zoning and decide if a building permit should be issued. (In this case, you will want to consult a lawyer).

Council does not have the authority to amend, change or ignore matters prescribed under the Building Code Act and the Ontario Building Code. 

The Town does not conduct pre-purchase inspections. (For information on purchasing the services of a pre-purchase building inspection service, please refer to the Yellow Pages under Home Inspections).

However, if you have questions or concerns about your new home, or to determine if a finished basement or apartment is legal and meets the Ontario Building Code and Property Standards requirements, you can contact the Town's Building Department.

As the new home owner, it is your responsibility to ensure you use the home in a manner that meets the Ontario Building Code. Do not assume the previous owner obtained a building permit before doing renovations to the home.

If you are the owner of a property designated under Part IV or V of the Ontario Heritage Act, you will be required to complete the Heritage review process prior to obtaining a building permit.

You should be aware that special situations may affect a proposed demolition.

Heritage buildings intended for designation or formally designated as having historic or architectural significance under the Ontario Heritage Act are subject to certain conditions:

a) Building intended for designation cannot be demolished without local Council approval;

b) Designation does not permanently prohibit demolition but requires a permit to be obtained to demolish a building on a designated property. If the council refuses such a permit, no demolition may take place for 180 days. This is to allow an opportunity to negotiate with the owner to somehow preserve the distinctive character of the building.

Projects to Single-Residential Unit Buildings

(Note: for buildings with basement apartments or duplexes, or more than two dwelling units see the “multi-residential buildings” section)

  • construct a new building
  • change all or part of a building's use i.e. converting part of a home to an office in which the public will be admitted (e.g. massage therapist office)   
  • renovate, repair or add to a building
  • demolish or remove all or a portion of a building
  • install, change or remove non-load bearing partition walls
  • install, change or remove load-bearing walls
  • make new openings for, or change the size of, doors and windows
  • build a balcony or deck or enclose an existing deck
  • build a garage or a utility shed over 15m2
  • excavate a basement or construct a foundation
  • replace or repair a drainage membrane or weeping tile system 
  • install or modify heating, plumbing, and air conditioning systems, fireplaces, fireplace inserts and woodstoves
  • install kitchen or bathroom cupboards with plumbing
  • install new or modify existing plumbing
  • install, repair or modify a septic system
  • reconstruct a chimney
  • to finish a basement or convert a room to a bedroom
  • replace existing, same-size doors and windows, subject to distance from property lines
  • reinstall siding, subject to distance from property lines (NOTICE: In some cases aluminum or steel siding cannot be replaced with vinyl, wood, or other combustible cladding materials)  
  • build a utility shed under 108ft2 (10m2)
  • reshingle a roof, provided there is no structural work
  • install eavestroughs, provided that drainage is contained on your property
  • paint or decorate
  • reinstall/replace kitchen or bathroom cupboards without plumbing.
  • erect a fence (note: a fence to enclose swimming pools and outside hot tubs do require pool enclosure permit)
  • to install a pool or hot tub (note: a pool enclosure permit is however required)
  • electrical work (the Electrical Safety Authority, however, must inspect electrical installations)

Projects to Multi-Residential Buildings

  • construct a new building
  • renovate, repair or add to a building
  • demolish or remove all or a portion of a building
  • change all or part of a building's use (i.e. creating additional apartment units)   
  • install, change or remove non-load bearing partition walls
  • install, change or remove load-bearing walls 
  •  make new openings for, or change the size of, doors and windows
  • build a garage, balcony or deck or enclose an existing deck
  • build a utility shed over 108ft2 (10m2)
  • excavate a basement or construct a foundation
  • replace or repair a drainage membrane or weeping tile system 
  • install or modify any life safety or fire suppression system such as fire alarms, sprinkler or standpipe or fixed extinguishing systems.
  • install or modify heating, plumbing, and air conditioning systems, fireplaces, fireplace inserts and woodstoves
  • install or modify any portion of a plumbing system (including fixtures) 
  • install, repair or modify a septic system. Please include the linked Schedule 2 to all Septic applications on Cloud Permit 
  • reconstruct a chimney
  • to finish a basement or convert a room to a bedroom 
  • to install a pool or hot tub (note: may require a building permit or a pool enclosure permit, but not both)
  • erect signage
  • build a utility shed under 108ft2 (10m2)
  • paint or decorate
  • erect a fence (note: a fence to enclose swimming pools and outside hot tubs does require a pool enclosure permit)
  • electrical work (the Electrical Safety Authority, however, must inspect electrical installations)

Projects to Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional Buildings

  • construct a new building
  • renovate, repair or add to a building
  • demolish or remove all or a portion of a building
  • change a building's use (including adding additional suites)
  • install, change or remove non-load bearing partition walls
  • install, change or remove load-bearing walls
  • make new openings for, or change the size of, doors and windows
  • excavate a basement or construct a foundation
  • replace or repair a drainage membrane or weeping tile system 
  • install or modify any life safety or fire suppression system such as fire alarms, sprinkler or standpipe or fixed extinguishing systems.
  • install or modify heating, plumbing, and air conditioning systems, fireplaces, fireplace inserts and woodstoves
  • install or modify any portion of a plumbing system (including fixtures)
  • install, repair or modify a septic system
  • reconstruct a chimney
  • to install a pool or hot tub (note: may require a building permit or a pool enclosure permit, but not both)
  • erect signage
  • paint or decorate 
  • erect a fence (note: see applicable site plan agreements for requirements or restrictions)
  • electrical work (the Electrical Safety Authority, however, must inspect electrical installations)
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